Friday, November 26, 2010

Wilson Friday Barn. Taylorsville, North Carolina

After admiring the Turkey Tracks quilt at the Robert Allen barn, it was on to the next destination, the Wilson Friday barn.

This was really way out in the country, requiring even more brake hitting and U-turning. At this point after trying to read the tiny road names on the signs, I decided that I wanted to become dictator of the North Carolina Department of Transportation and make all the print on the signs LARGE so that they are easy to read from a distance, not when you get right up on them and it becomes impossible to stop and turn without becoming a stunt driver.

This is the next barn, way out in the county but in a lovely wooded area.



Wilson Friday Barn features a quilt “Eight-Pointed Star Flowers” and was made by Louisa Dacons Cass, c. 1890-1900, in Iredell County. The quilt currently is owned by the maker’s grandson, David Redmond and family of Statesville.

4 comments:

frayedattheedge said...

Oh I am so envious of your trip!! This is the earliest we have had snow here for 17 years - unfortunately, unlike you, there isn't really another part of the UK I could move to, to get away from the snow!!

moreidlethoughts said...

What impresses me is the detailed painting of the quilts.They look like giant photoshoppings!

Carolina said...

Seeing that beautiful quilt hanging on the side of that barn makes me feel slightly puzzled. Well, not even slightly, but very much. I know I've missed a couple of your posts (or more, sorry about that ;-)), but I'm wondering if the quilt is actually hanging there, or maybe it's a painting? Or a good Photoshop job. Perhaps if I scroll back to previous posts all will become clear.
Very enjoyable post. Love it when it makes me think. I so rarely do that ;-)

Karen said...

Anne: I hope your snow isn't a harbinger of a severe winter for you and Malcolm over there. I'm not a fan of snow, but I still want four seasons which is why I wouldn't move any farther south.

Di: Now you have me wondering about the quilts. But I can't find any information about how they were created, just how they were funded.

Carolina: I see you've gone back through the posts, so now you know! I'll have more barn quilts to blog about as there are close to 100 here in North Carolina within a couple hours of me.