Thursday, September 13, 2012

Barn Quilts, Randolph County, North Carolina

 A look at some of the barn quilts in northeast Randolph County, just a half hour south of Greensboro. Not as large and elaborate as the ones up in the mountains, but wonderful to search out and see.


This is called Tobacco Leaf, although the surrounding fields were empty of tobacco plants.



I wanted to call this Compass Rose, but the creator of the quilt labels it Providence Grove Star. It was put up by the Future Farmers of America at Providence Grove High School where this barn belongs.



And this is called Four Dancing Tulips, which I can see in the quilt. This is on a newish log cabin that from the road appeared to be used as a studio for the house next door. There are tons of potters in the area, so perhaps they are using it for that.

9 comments:

Toffeeapple said...

I like the barns as much as I do the quilts. It is so nice to see the NC countryside.

Isabelle said...

Very interesting.

From your comment on my blog, things sound rather warm around your parts. Wrap up well if you ever come to Scotland!

Matt Bennett said...

Karen,
thanks for sharing the photos and information. Now that you mention it, most of the ones I've seen here are miniature versions of those in the mountains. BTW, saw some of these too when I was in Kentucky!

Rose L said...

Would be cool to see a real quilt made with one block of each from the buildings!

Cathy at PotterJotter said...

I just love the whole concept of Barn Quilts and the tulip one is one I have not seen before - maybe I'll put that pattern onto one of my bowls! Your photos are spectacular - love the old house in the last post. xCathy

Karen said...

Toffeeapple: And the barns are still in good shape and being used. The quilts just add a fillip to them, I think.

Isabelle: Thank you for visiting. I think that if I came to Scotland, as used to this hot North Carolina weather that I am, I'd have to add long underwear to my wardrobe. It is in the 60's here today and I have a sweatshirt and socks on.

Matt: Yes, generally the ones up in the mountains use four of these blocks to create a barn quilt. But I like what Randolph County is doing and if the weather cooperates (unlike today), back for more photos. You should post more too.

Rose L: They would definitely have to call that a crazy quilt.

Cathy: I hope the tulips inspire you and if so, please post a picture on your blog.

Diane said...

As a quilter, I love the barn quilts! So nice to find someone else that likes taking pictures of clouds and old buildings too. I sure hate to see some of the buildings falling farther and farther into disrepair. If I was very wealthy, that's where my money would go.

Karen said...

Diane: Thank you for visiting! I wish I could find a way to make a blog of nothing but cloud photos interesting.

Barn quilts are one of my most favorite things to find and take photos of.

Tim and Kristy said...

Hello, stumbled upon your blog looking for quilt designs for the outside of our home. I love the quilt on the Upper Mountain Research Station Dairy Barn. I was wondering if you ever found any information on the pattern? Thanks for any information you could give me. Your photographs are beautiful.