Thursday, June 16, 2011

Fledgling Robin


While I was out taking pictures of my rather pathetic looking garden, I could hear a robin calling out in the common area. It dawned on me that it wasn't out there by itself as I could here a high pitched answering chirp.

I opened the back gate, looked out and found this fledgling robin just a few feet away. The adult robin backed off a few feet and then started sounding an alarm call that got the fledgling all agitated. I took some not-quite-so-good pictures as I didn't want to harass either bird and then left them both alone.

Robins fledge from the nest about four days before they can even fly. They will hop short distances and perch in low lying bushes and foliage. The parents will remain near the fledglings for up to two weeks after they leave the nest, feeding and protecting them. I read that the adults will even dive bomb humans who get too close like mockingbirds, but this adult just hopped around and called as I took snapshots. Less than 25% of all robin fledglings make to their first birthday.

I went out the next morning to the common area near the white oak where I left him the night before, but he was no longer there. I hope he made it to somewhere safe.

5 comments:

Dartford Warbler said...

A great photo. It captures his vulnerability so beautifully. I hope he makes it into adulthood.

frayedattheedge said...

A lovely photo! We only see robins in the garden in the winter- they spend the summer out in the woods.

Anyes said...

Let's send him great energy and strength vibes and may he grow up to be a beautiful Robin.

Carolina said...

I totally agree with the previous commenters. Only, unlike frayedattheedge, we do see Robins in our garden throughout the year. European Robins are different from American Robins.

Karen said...

DW: I hope so, too although the percentages are against it.

Anne: I see them in the garden all the time and if our winter is mild enough, through the winter too.

Anyes: I'm keeping my fingers crossed too.

Carolina: You're correct. The American Robin was misnamed by the early European settlers. They are actually thrushes while the European Robin is a songbird.