Thursday, December 9, 2010

Rara Avis

Well, actually not, if you are speaking in terms of the International Union for Conservation of Nature's (IUCN) Red List. The Northern Mockingbird is a permanent resident bird throughout the entire United States. The mockingbird is a common sighting just like my cardinals and house finches.

But in terms of coming to my feeders, this is the first time this year that I've seen one in the little garden. In these past few winters, it has been a rare visitor to my patio. They nest in the summer across the parking lot in a huge holly tree and I can hear them sing all summer long from very early in the morning to very late at night. But it seems to take a lot in the way of severe weather to bring them to my garden.



6 comments:

rachel said...

What a beauty! So nice for me to be able to see these birds that mostly we just read about!

moreidlethoughts said...

Best close-up I've ever seen.

(I updated my post with a captioned video)

Dan said...

I've never seen a mockingbird before. These are beautiful pictures Karen. (I wonder if they will remember your feeder next winter too)
Dan
-x-

frayedattheedge said...

I've never seen one before either. You definitely get a better class of birds - and your photos are super!!

Anyes said...

You're the talk of Birdie Town...Best food on the block for miles away ;-)

Karen said...

Rachel: The Northern Mockingbird is the only mockingbird here in North America and is resident throughout all 50 states. It just never, ever comes to the feeder so this was a pleasant surprise.

Di: Thanks and thanks for the video. Still wish that maybe PBS could pick up the show.


Dan: Let's hope so. I always take the feeders down during the summer as the birds have other more natural sources of food. But, they always seem to find them once the feeders go up for the winter.

Anne: Well, I would beg to differ since you have the blue tit and the Great Spotted Woodpecker which I don't have.

Anyes: Actually cheap seed from WalMart, but I think it is the peanuts in the mix that brings them in.